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Club-a-Dub-Dub: The Beatrice Inn Boys Spread Out

Out There

Manhattan’s ever-evolving men about town are reclaiming the dirty Gotham streets with three new swilling ports that are going to blow the manholes off the current nightlife scene. A peek inside.

The terrible trio that co-owned and conceived of downtown Manhattan’s now-legendary Beatrice Inn-Paul Sevigny, Matt Abramcyk and the singularly named Andre’-all are opening separate nightclubs this fall.

Yes, Sevigny has since opened the red-hot Kenmare bistro and club (in NoHo), and Abramcyk, the awesome sports-atorium 77 Warren (in TriBeCa), post-Beatrice speakeasy, RIP. But now we are talking bona-fide and BIG nightclubs, set for early fall openings. All as well are downtown spaces, all have character-rich history. All could be the long-rumored “next Beatrice.” But can we just…let it go?

Abramcyk’s yet-to-be-named club is the most ambitious. More than 3,000 square feet, beneath the Meat District’s cobblestoned streets, the space is architecturally-minded (as is Senor Matt), featuring barrel-vaulted ceilings, and views from below actual manholes. It will have a dance floor, and at least two bars. And, we hear, it’s going to be open ’til the cow’s come home (to die).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suave-bola Sevigny is co-partnering with veteran nightlife impresario Don Hill to add some raucous life and lookers to the eponymous live music club in the West SoHo zone, which has been there for years. This is a very cool thing.

And Andre is going to bring some of his European chic to Little Italy, taking over an old karaoke club, and renaming it Le Baron, which will be the satellite to his enduringly artsy-cool club in Paris of the same name.

We’re seeing a new nightclub triangle forming, and we like it-a lot. Manhattan hasn’t been the City That Never Sleeps for an inordinate amount of time. Let the revelry begin.

image via Jeffery Donenfeld

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