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GLEN CAMPBELL – THE GOODBYE TOUR

Out There

Becoming a bona fide living legend isn’t as easy as Glen Campbell makes it look. First, you have to have a solid foundation of talent on which to build – like being one of the hottest guitar players in the world. Then you have to record songs that will stand the test of time – standards such as “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” and “Wichita Lineman.” And of course, to be a “living” legend, you need to survive the harsh reality of a celebrity lifestyle. Check, check, and check. Early publicity photo. Although Glen was already hitting the top of both the country and pop charts by 1969, the Goodtime Hour gave his career “legs.” The popular CBS musical variety series was simulcast on the BBC from England to Singapore to Australia and paved the way for five BBC specials. The exposure gave Glen a global presence he enjoys to this day, 30+ years later. He has toured the UK, Europe, Southeast Asia, Australia and New Zealand. As recently as 2000, Glen’s popularity in the UK sustained a 31-day tour of the region. The success of the Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour was due to Glen’s triple-decker talent as a musician, singer and humorist and the guests he brought on the show. Glen gave viewers what they wanted: the best talent in a variety of entertainment and musical genres – Buck Owens and Lucille Ball; Eric Clapton with Cream and Kenny Rogers with The First Edition; Anne Murray and Ray Charles; Merle Haggard and Stevie Wonder; Neil Diamond, Johnny Cash and Ella Fitzgerald. In the process, Glen gave a tremendous boost to the careers of many fledgling artists. “We had a lot of country, but we did every kind of music,” Glen explains. “The Monkees were on, and so was Johnny Cash.” Glen’s accolades as a musician and singer are as impressive as his talent. He made history by winning a Grammy in both country and pop categories in 1967: “Gentle On My Mind” snatched the country honors, and “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” won in pop. He owns trophies for Male Vocalist of the Year from both the CMA and the ACM, and took the CMA’s top honor as Entertainer of the Year. Glen at his 66th birthday celebration. During his 40 years in show business, Glen has released more than 70 albums. He has sold 45 million records and racked up 12 RIAA Gold albums, 4 Platinum albums and 1 Double-Platinum album. Of his 75 trips up the charts, 27 landed in the Top 10. In the 1990s, Glen released a series of gospel albums, which opened up new vistas for the star and garnered a prestigious Dove Award. His tell-all autobiography, Rhinestone Cowboy, shot to the best-seller list when it was released in 1994. He released The Glen Campbell Collection (1962-1989) in 1997 and a new Christmas album in 1999. Living in Phoenix with his wife, Kim, and their three children, ages 15, 17 and 19, Glen is reaping the rewards of 40 years of hard work. He is in the enviable – and well-earned – position of being able to pick and choose his tour dates and appearances, and he gets to spend quality time with his family. Even on the road, Glen has family at hand. His eldest daughter Debby, joined his stage show in 1987 and has toured with him ever since.

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