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Punk Gets the Glam Treatment

Fashion

The MET’s Costume Institute saves the Queen…again.

Opening May 9th (through the snoozy museum dog-days of August 14th) is the Met’s “PUNK: Chaos to Couture,” and we surmise they figured: “If it worked with glam-rock style?” Roll out all those safety-pinned numbers on Richard Hell and Johnny Lydon, many of which were concocted and mainstreamed into the shopping malls by Malcolm and Vivienne.

Of course we applaud the street fashion-turned-haute couture that rose out of Brit-and-America’s punk music scenes. Is there anything making the runways today that inspires more? We don’t condone crashing the big ball, but wouldn’t that be punk-tastic?

Here is how the Museum, with the usual Conde Nast-sponsoring, describes the show: “The Met’s spring 2013 Costume Institute exhibition, ‘PUNK: Chaos to Couture,’ will examine punk’s impact on high fashion from the movement’s birth in the early 1970s through its continuing influence today. Featuring approximately 100 designs for men and women, the exhibition will include original punk garments and recent, directional fashion to illustrate how haute couture and ready-to-wear borrow punk’s visual symbols.

“Focusing on the relationship between the punk concept of “do-it-yourself” and the couture concept of “made-to-measure,” the seven galleries will be organized around the materials, techniques, and embellishments associated with the anti-establishment style.

“Themes will include New York and London, which will tell punk’s origin story as a tale of two cities, followed by Clothes for Heroes and four manifestations of the D.I.Y. aesthetic—Hardware, Bricolage, Graffiti and Agitprop, and Destroy. Presented as an immersive multimedia, multisensory experience, the clothes will be animated with period music videos and soundscaping audio techniques.”

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